Mauot Anyang’s Farewell Blog

My name is Mauot Anyang. I am a Mandela Washington fellow from South Sudan. There, I work as the Secretary of Education for South Sudan Association of the Visually Impaired (SSAVI), a non-governmental and not-for-profit organization for the blind in South Sudan.

Before I began my fellowship, I wondered how it would feel to be in a place where you don’t know anyone nor does anyone know you; and I thought it would be uncomfortable and difficult. However, after my fellowship placement at the World Institute on Disability, I got the answer, which disputed my previous belief and changed it. This experience was unique, beginning from the friendly environment of the universally designed Ed Roberts Campus where I found people who were ready to share with me all kinds of information to the accommodation of providing me with JAWS on my work computer to mobility orientation.

A woman and a man stand at a counter in aprons
Mauot at a cooking class | Photo by Roshan Samarawickrama

I had the opportunity, under the auspices of the institute, to meet people and organizations who are actively engaged in all aspects of the disability sector. I was able to learn issues that are new to me, such as climate change and nutrition as they relate to disability. I was also able to strengthen my knowledge of policy advocacy and get in-depth information about the history of the independent living movement in the US. I learned that this movement opened the door for people with disabilities to enjoy rights and freedoms on an equal basis with the rest of society’s members.

On a personal level, I became very independent by using the public transport, such as the buses, the BART train, and Lyft on my own. My appreciation for this goes to the wonderful mobility instructors that were secured for me my first week. I also had the opportunity to take cooking classes. Before these classes, I thought some cooking skills were hard to acquire as a blind person, but now I believe all the skills I learned are attainable. I also had the chance to play Goalball. My team won a match and lost another, but that is the spirit of the sport. Finally, I really enjoyed cultural events in the Bay Area; if I just mention the food trucks and Muir Woods, and you are from the Bay Area, you probably will know what I mean.

A man reaches out to touch small trees; a woman beside him guides his touch
Mauot feels the tactile map at Muir Woods in San Francisco | Photo by Roshan Samarawickrama

I believe my appreciation of this experience will not be limited to my own words, but rather it will be echoed by the people with disabilities in the rural areas of South Sudan, who only enjoy one right, which is the right to live and nothing else. I discovered more rights that I want for my people—rights that none of them has ever experienced, myself included. My hope is for sustainable happiness one day that will include every disabled person in South Sudan; and that by increasing the scale of my advocacy, people with disabilities in my country can enjoy the same rights as in the US. I bear in mind that the path to realize this vision is not always smooth and easy, but I believe in the possibility and the need for its realization now more than ever.

I highly appreciate the supervision from all of the World Institute on Disability’s staff members, who generously allocated their time and gave all the attention necessary to enlighten my way while working to realize my goals.

I can’t mention each contribution from everyone who helped me enjoy my internship, but what everybody has done is highly valued. The simplest thing that I can say is that I felt at home, I gained knowledge, I had fun, and I made friends.

A man smiles, a chocolate cake on the table in front of him
Mauot says goodbye | Photo by WID

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One thought on “Mauot Anyang’s Farewell Blog

  1. Pingback: International Fellowships – World Institute on Disability

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