WID Supports the Transformation to Competitive Employment Act

Statement from Anita Shafer Aaron, WID Executive Director/CEO

Feb 01, 2019, Berkeley, CA

On January 31, Rep. Bobby Scott, Sen. Bob Casey, and Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers introduced the Transformation to Competitive Employment Act, which provides states, service providers, sub-minimum wage certificate holders, and other agencies with the resources to help workers with disabilities transition into competitive, integrated employment. This legislation is designed to strengthen and enhance the disability employment service delivery systems throughout states, while sub-minimum wages- currently allowed under Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act-are to be phased out over a six-year period.

The World Institute on Disability (WID) supports this legislation. We are strongly committed to competitive, integrated employment in mainstream environments for people with disabilities and further that they receive fair and equitable wages for their work.

The employment rate for people with disabilities has been flat for over forty years (hovering around 33%) and many of those who are employed are in sub-minimum wage jobs. It is time to promote legislation that intends to make people with disabilities an equal and included part of the American labor pool.

WID’s mission in communities and nations worldwide is to eliminate barriers to full social integration and increase employment, economic security, and health care for persons with disabilities. WID’s signature program-WID E3-addresses the need for integrated, competitive employment options for people with disabilities.

Employment & Economic Empowerment

The Labor Force Participation Rate for the general public is 77%. For people with disabilities, that rate has been hovering around 33% for the last 40+ years. This is in spite of 40+ years of numerous employment initiatives, laws, and programs created to promote people with disabilities entering the workforce. The question is: what’s missing?

The American labor pool-which includes captains of industry, business owners, employees, and prospective job seekers-needs a “first-step” educational effort designed to improve both the competitive employment expectations and knowledge of people with disabilities. WID E3 is such an effort.

WID E3 offers online resources and technical assistance designed to improve competitive employment outcomes for both youth and adults with disabilities. WID E3 fills the gap between where people might be and where other programs usually start. It is basic training, and when implemented, it’s a bridge.

WID E3 logo-a white Globe and E3 in white letters

The Employment Empowerment module creates a new disability employment perspective and teaches fundamental competitive employment skills. This instruction builds self-confidence and the knowledge necessary to become a competitive job applicant and employee who happens to have a disability.

The Economic Empowerment module shares new asset development and financial planning strategies, including the book EQUITY: Asset Building Strategies for People with Disabilities, A Guide to Financial Empowerment, developed by WID’s internal financial specialists. This section of WID E3 also offers a comprehensive guide for ABLE accounts to help people with disabilities navigate the ABLE program and plan for the future.

The Benefits Empowerment module offers disability benefits planning, training, and resources, including state-specific Disability Benefits 101 (DB101) online tools. Understanding the impact on federal and state benefits allows for accurate, informed decision-making about employment.

The goals of the Transformation to Competitive Employment Act can be achieved with the Employment and Economic Empowerment programs WID has developed, and we are confident these tools will assist the workforce as a whole in becoming an inclusive, integrated space for employees with disabilities.

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