2018 Conference Accessibility Initiative

For the third consecutive year, the World Institute on Disability (WID) and JPMorgan Chase & Co. partnered with several civil rights and community development organizations to highlight conference accessibility.

Much like in 2016 and 2017, WID and JPMorgan Chase acheived this by providing accessibility enhancements, such as sign language interpreters, open captioning, accessible transportation, rented mobility devices, sighted guides, scholarships for Disability Ambassadors, and a disability concierge desk, as well as support and training for conference organizers, hotel staff, and A/V teams.

WID was delighted to partner again with captioner, Deanna Baker, who helped us ensure thousands of people experienced open captioning for the first time in 2016 and thousands more in 2017!

Organizations Served in 2018

If you haven’t already, be sure to visit our main Conference Accessibility Initiative page to learn more about our initiative.

Association for Enterprise Opportunity

“Attending the conference was yet another unexpected and wonderful opportunity I had on my professional journey as an actor, activist and entrepreneur.”-Diana Jordan

Read about the experience in the words of our AEO Disability Ambassadors.

Diana Jordan’s Blog (PDF)

Todd Camarata’s Blog (PDF)

And enjoy some photos from the event.

NeighborWorks America

“The NTI was a great networking opportunity and allowed me to hear concrete examples of great work going on in communities across the country.”-Allison Lourash

Read about the experience in the words of our NeighborWorks Disability Ambassadors.

Allison Lourash Blog (PDF)

Melissa Mitchell Blog (PDF)

Richard Rueda Blog (PDF)

And enjoy some photos from the event.

Center for Financial Services Innovation

“By exposing other people to new points of view and difference in capabilities, I hope to have educated and pushed individuals to think more about individuals with disabilities in the world of fintech and finance!”- Ray Parker

Read about the experience in the words of our CFSI Disability Ambassadors.

Susan Wang Blog (PDF)

Harry Hebeler Blog (PDF)

Ray Grand Blog (PDF)

Ray Parker Blog (PDF)

And enjoy some photos from the event.

National Fair Housing Alliance

Blogs
Photos

Florida Housing Coalition

Coming soon

Prosperity Now

Coming soon

Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute

Coming soon

Congressional Black Caucus Foundation

Coming soon

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Job Announcement: Projects Coordinator

Note: This position has been filled. Thank you for your interest.

ABOUT WID:

The World Institute on Disability (WID) is an internationally recognized nonprofit public policy center. WID’s mission, in communities and nations worldwide, is to eliminate barriers to full social integration and increase employment, economic security, and health care for persons with disabilities. WID creates innovative programs and tools; conducts research, public education, training, and advocacy campaigns; and provides technical assistance.

Currently WID operates with a staff of 10 employees, a variety of interns and volunteers, and numerous partners and collaborators; with corporate headquarters located at the Ed Roberts Campus in Berkeley, California. Since its founding in 1983, WID has earned a reputation for high-quality research and public education on a wide range of issues. The Board of Directors and staff, over half of whom are people with disabilities, are respected national leaders in the disability rights field as well as in industry, government, and social services. This enables WID to bring a cross-disability perspective to the policy arena. Information on WID’s programs can be found at www.wid.org.

POSITION SUMMARY:

The Projects Coordinator position directly supports the Director of Operations and the daily operations of the agency by responding to information and referral requests, assisting in WID front office/reception area related duties and providing reasonable accommodation upon request to staff with disabilities. Additionally, this position will be trained to be a researcher to proctor and work on WIDs disability usability testing program. This position assists in special event planning, including event logistics, registration, and donor acknowledgements. This position assists in the development and distribution of website, print, video and social media communication collateral. In addition, the Projects Coordinator will be assigned to various contract/grant project work that includes research and service initiatives.

HOURS:

40 hours per week

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Experience using MS Office Suite, dropbox, Gmail and the Internet
  • Professional writing and oral communication skills
  • Experience using office equipment and phones
  • Friendly, conscientious, organized, detail oriented, punctual
  • Works well independently, takes initiative
  • Quick learner, ability to problem solve
  • Ability to travel for project related assignments 

PREFERENCES: 

  • Experience creating PowerPoint documents and visual presentations of complex data
  • Experience using Internet sites to efficiently arrange, purchase and track multiple travel itineraries
  • Experience proofreading, formatting and mailing newsletter articles using email campaign software such as MailChimp
  • Experience with online survey software (such as Survey Gizmo) and data analysis
  • Experience with content management systems, WordPress experience preferable
  • Video production experience preferred
  • Experience with event planning and marketing
  • Knowledge of and/or personal experience with Independent Living history and philosophy
  • Experience performing personal assistance services to people with disabilities

REPORTING RELATIONSHIP:

Director of Operations

STATUS:  

Non-Exempt, full-time, benefits

COMPENSATION:

$40,000.00 annual salary

APPLICATION PROCESS:

Send Resume, Cover letter and References to: World Institute on Disability

EMAIL: kat@wid.org (WID acknowledges receipt of applications by email only)

Application Deadline: June 29, 2018 at 5:00 p.m. PDT

Proposed Start Date: Mid-July

REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS:

  • Address reasonable accommodation requests for the application/interview process to kat@wid.org.
  • WID promotes a scent/chemical free environment. To support this effort, WID asks that all applicants refrain from wearing scented products while in its office.

TRAVEL/RELOCATION:

WID cannot cover the cost of travel or relocation, but encourages all interested applicants to apply.

The World Institute on Disability is an equal opportunity employer with a commitment to diversity. Individuals will not be discriminated against regardless of race, ethnicity, religion (creed), national origin, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, disability or veteran status, and other personal characteristics.

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Several open books, piled on top of each other with pencils resting inside

Empowering People with Disabilities to Achieve their Financial Goals with TD Bank

The topic of financial empowerment has increasingly influenced economic discourse in recent years, as a growing number of Americans experience financial insecurity. One particular group of Americans, however, receives nominal attention when it comes to financial empowerment and these are individuals with disabilities.

Research shows that providing people of all abilities and backgrounds with the financial knowledge, tools, access and resources they need to make better financial decisions is not only a social good, it’s also economically expedient, increasing labor participation, while reducing costly government benefits.

In their ground-breaking work, Financial Literacy and Economic Outcomes: Evidence and Policy Implications, Mitchell and Lusardi suggest that nearly one-third of wealth inequality can be explained by the financial-knowledge gap. According to the authors, this gap could increase as consumers confront ever-more sophisticated financial products and services.

Given that around 56.7 million people — 19 percent of the population – have a disability, according to the 2010 census; nearly 16 million Americans with a disability age 25 or older have at least some college education; and over two million have annual incomes over $50,000 (more here), providing financial education and access to people with disabilities is vital to facilitating a healthier, more inclusive economy.

Illuminating a history of invisibility

People with disabilities have faced economic exclusion throughout history, largely owing to discriminatory attitudes and policies. And 28 years after the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, individuals with disabilities continue to battle against rampant societal and institutionalized bias.

Frequently stereotyped as unproductive and/or costly to accommodate, individuals with disabilities have suffered higher rates of unemployment along with lower levels of income and savings.

A 2015 survey from the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority’s Investor Education Foundation shows that people with disabilities reported lower scores on a financial literacy test than their non-disabled counterparts (44% vs. 53% average) and had lower self-perceived levels of financial knowledge (70% vs. 81%). People with disabilities are also more than twice as likely to find it “very difficult” to cover expenses and bills (23% vs. 9%), and twice as likely to be unbanked (12% vs. 6%), according to leading research.

Exacerbating the equity gap, many government disability benefit programs cap savings at $2,000, a clear disincentive for individuals with disabilities to become financially self-sufficient.

Addressing this inequity demands a radical shift in public perception along with educational tools and opportunities that empower individuals with disabilities to lead more independent and productive lives.

The power of progress

Thanks to growing awareness around the economic advantages of financial empowerment, the Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act is one of a handful of progressive policies that is enabling individuals with disabilities to save money for the first time in history, without jeopardizing their Federal benefits.  Governmental agencies, nonprofits and purpose-driven banks (including TD Bank, Bank of America, Citi and others) have begun introducing programs and services to better serve current and future customers with disabilities.

In fact, TD Bank recently launched an Adaptive Financial Education program that offers a variety of on-site seminars along with interactive tools, tutorials and games that enable “individuals with diverse abilities” and their caregivers to navigate their financial lives more independently and successfully. This program teaches the fundamentals of banking to a segment of people that has been woefully underserved.

As a direct consequence of these new policies and programs, individuals with disabilities are able to work more and save more, eliminate overdraft fees, and improve their credit scores. They are purchasing more homes, establishing college savings plans for themselves and their children, and leading more fulfilling lives.

Given this trend, I can’t wait to see the 2020 census results.

Of this I am sure: When we, as a country, financially empower people with disabilities, we create a more vibrant and inclusive economy for all.

Written by Thomas Foley, J.D., Managing Director of the World Institute on Disability; published on the WID website April 16, 2018.

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Job Announcement: Executive Secretary to the Executive Director and Board of Directors

Note: This position has been filled. Thank you for your interest.

ABOUT WID:

The World Institute on Disability (WID) is an internationally recognized nonprofit public policy center. WID’s mission in communities and nations worldwide is to eliminate barriers to full social integration and increase employment, economic security and health care for persons with disabilities. WID creates innovative programs and tools; conducts research, public education, training and advocacy campaigns and provides technical assistance.

Currently, WID operates with a staff of 12 employees, many collaborators, consultants, interns and regular volunteers and is located at the Ed Roberts Campus in Berkeley, California. Since its founding in 1983, WID has earned a reputation for high-quality research and public education on a wide range of issues. The board of directors and staff, over half of whom are people with disabilities, are respected national leaders in the disability rights field, as well as in industry, government and social services. This enables WID to bring a cross-disability perspective to the policy arena. Information on WID’s programs can be found at www.wid.org.

DESCRIPTION:

The goal of the Executive Secretary to the Executive Director and Board of Directors position is to enable the work of the board and executive director to occur in a smooth and seamless manner to support WID’s ability to carry out its mission. This position provides support to the WID Board of Directors and Executive Director by working at the direction of and in conjunction with the Executive Director, focusing on resource development, communications and public relations.

POSITION SUMMARY:

Support to Board of Directors

  • Prepare agendas and write, draft or gather briefing materials for quarterly and special board and committee meetings;
  • Schedule meetings of the Executive Director and various board committees and members;
  • Handle travel arrangements for board members and the Executive Director as needed;
  • Handle all reasonable accommodation requests by board members and Executive Director;
  • Attend, in person or by phone, board and executive committee meetings. Write and publish minutes. Maintain corporate minute book and electronic files;
  • Plan and carry out meeting preparations and logistical arrangements, including meeting locations, hotel sites, transportation companies, restaurants and audio/visual companies as needed;
  • Manage communication with board members on resource development activities;
  • Update board website when website is complete;
  • Prepare action items and follow up after each meeting;
  • Plan annual Board Orientation and Continuing Education programs for directors;
  • Draft appropriate correspondence for Chairperson and/or Executive Director;
  • Prepare briefing papers, outlines, Chairperson’s agenda, etc. for Chairperson;
  • Manage annual request to board members for completion of conflicts of interest statements;
  • Plan committee calendar and timing of meetings for standing and ad hoc committees;
  • Attend, by phone, committee meetings. Write and publish minutes or summarize meetings for consent calendar;
  • Follow up with committee chairs/members on action items; and
  • Prepare written advance materials for reporting to the Board of Directors.

Support to Executive Director

  • Provide reasonable accommodation support to Executive Director as needed;
  • Manage calendar, travel arrangements, appointments, etc.;
  • Assist with material development associated with grant proposals, partnering agreement, letters of intent and collaboration;
  • Oversee the management of contact lists associated with resource development and fundraising activities such as special events, mailings, donor correspondence, etc.;
  • Develop an annual calendar of events related to board meetings, WID special events and grants submissions and reporting, including all timelines for all activities associated with these items;
  • Serve as editor and publicist of WID publications, reports, proposals, etc.; and
  • Other duties as assigned by the Executive Director to successfully support the agenda of the organization.

LOCATION:

The position is intended to be carried out remotely with standardized hours in relation to the Pacific Time Zone.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Strong writing skills, including composition and proofreading;
  • Strong oral communication skills;
  • Highly organized and detail oriented; and
  • Associate of Arts degree with a minimum of three years of experience working with boards and executive leadership in an administrative assistant or executive secretary role.

PREFERENCES: 

  • Bachelors of Arts degree; and
  • Personal or professional experience with the Independent Living Movement.

REPORTING RELATIONSHIP:

Executive Director

STATUS:

Non-Exempt, Part-Time

COMPENSATION:

$25-$30/hour for an average of 30 hours/week (some flexibility in time required), plus benefits

APPLICATION PROCESS:

Send resume, cover letter, writing sample and references to: kat@wid.org
RE: Secretary for the Board of Directors and Executive Director Search

Headquarters:

World Institute on Disability
3075 Adeline Street, Suite 155
Berkeley, CA  94703

Proposed Start Date:

March 1, 2018, or when filled

REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS:

  • Address reasonable accommodation requests for the application/interview process to the Human Resources office (kat@wid.org); and
  • WID promotes a scent/chemical free environment. To support this effort, WID asks that all applicants refrain from wearing scented products while in its office.

TRAVEL/RELOCATION:

WID cannot cover the cost of travel or relocation but encourages all interested applicants to apply.

All persons—including people with disabilities, elders, women, and people of racial and ethnic minority—are encouraged to apply.

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CES 2018

WID staff member, Kat Zigmont, attended the 2018 International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada. The following is her report on the event.

A collage of three photos: Anita Aaron being guided through the accessibility section of the exibit floor, CES 2018 Whoa logo, Kat Standing in front of large CES sign.

Accessibility Services

At the CES 2018 convention, we had excellent service from the Accessibility Services team. We were informed that there were eight sighted guides working at any given time. The service was friendly, flexible, and accommodating to the needs of the convention participants.

FeedbackInformation & Accessibility Services Desk at CES 2018

As a first time participant at CES, I was unprepared for the size and number of venues, as well as the amount of people and vendors. I found the accessibility group that was there with me to review products very helpful and communicative with regards to their strategy on making their way through the event and giving tips on interesting things to see.

Trends

In the vision loss area, there were many versions of glasses and/or glasses attachments that assisted in seeing text and navigation. I found that there were various grades of the same type of products; some had much more advanced technology than others, such as a product that was wireless and small versus a similar product that was wired and a bit clunky.

Highlights

I have put an asterisk (*) near my favorite products listed below.

Visited Booths

Vision Loss

*American Printing House (APH) – Graphiti

www.aph.org

APH had a new product, Graphiti, which was touch interfacing using variable-height pins. With this device, the user can view graphics imputed via a USB, HDMI or SD port, as well as Bluetooth. The graphic display would present accessible forms of graphics, such as charts, maps, photographs and other dynamic graphical content. This device also allows the user to draw on the surface; as your finger touches the screen, the pins rise and follow your touch, offering haptic feedback. The price of Graphiti has not been set yet.

Beltmap – The electronic guide dogThe Beltmap booth

www.beltmap.com

Beltmap was an interesting concept where an individual would wear a belt that offered navigational directions through vibrations. The Beltmap would connect via Bluetooth to the user’s Smartphone and would use Google maps (specifically) to get directions. As a user walks and turns, Beltmap can tell her direction and give her vibrations on the side where she needs to turn. Once she turns, the vibrations stop, indicating that she is supposed to walk forward until otherwise alerted. The unique aspect to this device is that it is not auditory. The fallback is that it is not yet able to work indoors/on Wifi and thus, could not work in airports or conferences, examples of loud areas where this device could be useful.

Dot Watch – Braille watchThe Dot Watch

www.dotincorp.com/store

Dot Watch is an attractive, Braille watch that allows you to sync with your Smartphone to check notifications, get alarms and see who is calling. The Dot Watch costs $359.00.

FACIL’iti – Websites’ accessibility

www.facil-iti.com

FACIL’iti offers a product that can make an existing website more accessible to individuals with vision loss and certain cognitive and mobility disabilities. This system inserts a profile module into an already existing site where an individual will specify his needs. Once the profile is complete, the software will adjust the site in a variety of ways to help make the site more accessible. For example, as a dyslexic user you can specify having an issue with b’s and d’s, and the software code will then identify those letters to you. Other examples of access aides are zooming capabilities, as well as making larger targets for those who have shaky hands. This product is approximately $400.00 to have it added to your website.

ICI Vision – Expanding the limits of visionThe ICI Vision booth

www.ici.vision

ICI Vision is a medical device company that has made a pair of glasses that claims to recover central vision due to retinal damage. As it was explained to me, the glasses record video of surrounding areas, and then they project light into the wearer’s eyes that restore images where once the user had blind spots. This device was not able to be tried on at the CES event as it was still in medical trials. The target audience seems to be especially small, and there was no research that could be referenced at their booth.

*ORCAM MyEye 2.0The OrCam 2.0

www.orcam.com

ORCAM MyEye 2.0 is a lightweight device that snaps onto any eyeglass frame magnetically. It reads printed or digital text, recognizes faces and identifies products and common items, such as currency. While wearing this device, you can point your finger ahead of you toward the item you want read, and the sound comes out of the back of the device near your ear. This device worked reasonably well and was nicely designed so that it is appealing and pretty discrete.

Project RayProject Ray booth with products displayed

http://project-ray.com

Project Ray provides technology designed to facilitate the operation of common Smartphones by people who have vision loss by allowing them to use any off-the-shelf Smartphones with their tactile stickers that have chips that facilitates phone functions. These stickers are a tactile add-on that have quick function and navigation purposes. The product’s main feature is a simple, unified user interface that is automatically imposed across all system functions, applications and services, using only two types of interactive functions working as an overlay on top of existing mobile applications. This booth was also the only one that had a disabled exhibitor, which was refreshing.

Vditory – Enabling visually impaired to do moreThe Vditory product

www.vditory.com

Vditory is a pair of glasses that describes the user’s surroundings, including telling him if he is indoors or outdoors and describing the objects around him. Also, if a face were detected, Vditory would tell the user the face’s age, gender, and emotions. The device has face recognition for common faces, as well as color and currency recognition. There is also a GPS tracker and navigational modes.

VFO

www.vfogroup.com

The VFO booth had a very sophisticated, new, multifunctional magnifier. The interface was large, color touch screens that allowed you to pinch-zoom selected areas. The device was also an OCR scanner where you could export data to a USB. Additionally, there was voice output to read selected text. The multifunction of this magnifier was very appealing. The cost of this item was approximately $4,600.00.

Physical Disability/Chronic Pain

Infinity Massage Chairs – Wellness for life

http://infinitymassagechairs.com/

The Riage X3 chairs by Infinity Massage Chairs come with automated massage programs, but they are also customizable for when you want to target specific muscle groups or areas. One massage ability of the Riage X3 chairs is their L-Track, which covers your upper body vertically down the natural S curvature of the spine then across the lower body horizontally for complete alleviation of spinal tension; this provided long lasting comfort. Another massage ability of the Riage X3 chairs is their reflexology foot rollers to cure fatigue in your feet. Its shifting motion also helps blood circulation. The price point for this item was approximately $7,700.00.

Kleiber Bionics – Bionic Prosthetic Hand

www.kleiberbionics.org

Kleiber Bionics was displaying a Bionic Prosthetic Hand for people with various degrees of amputation. It had tactile sensors and varying grasp patterns. The prosthetic was attractive and looked durable and flexible. Unfortunally, it was difficult to get more detailed information from the individuals at the booth.

*Oscar Senior – The easiest way for seniors to connect to the worldThe Oscar Senior booth and products

www.oscarsenior.com

Oscar Senior is a telecom device that integrates Smartphone technology into a large and easy to understand display. It facilitates communication between the user and their families and caregivers with shortcut buttons that use icons and images to help easily identify functions. Functions include video calling, applications and quick web navigation. It’s an attractive design with useful applications. While it is marketed to seniors only, I can see this functionality being useful for cognitive and mobility disabilities, as well.

*Oska Pulse – When pain stops, life begins.The Oska Pulse

www.oskawellness.com

Oska Pulse is a device that uses optimized PEMF to restore the electrical potential cells need to receive nutrients and oxygen, which stimulates cellular regeneration. This relieves pain and activates the body’s natural recovery process. Oska Pulse promotes capillary dilation, muscle ease and pain reduction. It can help dilate blood vessels, which may reduce inflammation, increase blood flow and release the body’s natural endorphins. Additionally, it helps break the cycle of inflammation and pain by activating a cell-specific negative feedback loop that promotes joint and muscle recovery. The device is attractive and able to be worn discreetly. The price of this device is approximately $400. I actually bought this device for my chronic pain, as it is an interesting, non-invasive alternative to similar products.

VIVY Heats – Canned heat the reaches deep

www.vivyheats.com

VIVY is a consumer pain management product that offers the deep heating properties of diathermy in a safe, simple-to-use device that’s small enough to carry anywhere. VIVY relieves pain, eases muscle tension and improves joint mobility around chronic pain or joint injuries. It is an attractive, portable device that has a Smartphone app accompaniment. However, VIVY is currently an investigational device only and is not yet available for sale in America.

WHILL – Electronic wheelchairThe WHILL wheelchairs

www.whill.us

WHILL electronic wheelchairs are compact, attractive, all-terrain personal mobility devices. They have a modern design that is comfortable and ergonomic. They have sensitive joystick controls and all-wheel drive functionality.

Hearing Loss

SignAll – We translate sign language. Automatically.

www.signall.us

SignAll is an automated sign language translating system. The SignAll team worked with Gallaudet to record a database of commonly used signs and then created software that could recognize ASL and convert it to text or vice versa. SignAll is still piloting this product and hopes to develop a mobile application version as well as have more language databases. This is an innovative idea for ASL translation with the potential for many future applications.

*SmartEar – …Sound you can seeThe SmartEar booth with devices on the table

www.smartear.fr

SmartEar is a lighting system for your home that offers alerts. Each light is portable and customizable. With the app accompaniment, you can set alarms with different colors, pulsing of different speeds and duration. The SmartEar devices can hear the auditory cue such as the doorbell, fire alarm or telephone and will display your customized lighted visual alert. Alerts can be queued to all SmartEar devices in the house or just one. This design is practical for use in homes and offices.

Olive Union: Next-Gen Hearing Aid – Consumer grade hearing aidThe Olive device

www.oliveunion.com

The Olive Union: Next-Gen Hearing Aid is a consumer-grade hearing aid. The Olive was very nice looking but seemed a bit big. The app accompaniment offers hearing self-test, customized hearing profile and an active hearing status management. The cost of one Olive device is approximately $100.

*Noveto’s Sowlo – Sound delivered directly to your ears, and your ears only.

http://www.noveto.biz/technology/

Sowlo technology focuses the audio content directly and solely into the user’s ears, all without any intermediate hardware such as earphones. The system constantly tracks the user’s position and dynamically focuses the audio beams to follow the user’s ears, creating unique abilities to consume sound at a higher volume in a personal manner without affecting others’ experiences.

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WID Welcomes New Board Members: 2018

For Immediate Release

Berkeley, CA, USA–The World Institute on Disability welcomes four new members to the Board of Directors.  These representatives from law and policy, technology and banking include:

  • Tali Bray, San Francisco, Chief Information Officer for IT for IT, Wells Fargo
  • Darlene Hemerka, Equal Justice Works Fellow, the Public Interest Law Center
  • Neil Milliken, Head of Accessibility & Digital Inclusion, Atos
  • Brian Scarpelli, Senior Policy Counsel, ACT | The App Association

“These four outstanding individuals bring to WID enhanced ability to view our work through a broader geographic lens and to strengthen the impact of our work by building on expertise from technology, industry, law and disability rights as we confront critical issues facing people with disabilities both domestically and internationally,” said WID CEO, Anita Aaron.

Photos of four new board members

Bray, Hemerka, Milliken, and Scarpelli join WID’s current board members:

  • Carol J. Bradley, J.D., Chair, Disability Compliance Officer, Sutter Health
  • Heather Dowdy, Vice Chair, Accessibility Program Lead, Microsoft
  • Claire Forrest, Public Relations Coordinator, MacPhail Center for Music
  • Kevin Foster, Director of HR Operations, Motorola Solutions, Inc.
  • Sheridan Gates, MED, PCC, Treasurer Executive Coach, Purpose At Work
  • Eli Gelardin, Secretary, Executive Director, Marin Center for Independent Living (MCIL)
  • Malcom Glenn, Public Policy Manager, Uber
  • Nanci Linke-Ellis, Partner, General Manager, Captionfish
  • Julie McCarthy, former Director of Human Resources, Lighthouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired, San Francisco
  • Ari Ne’eman, Chief Executive Officer, MySupport.com
  • Michael Palmer, Senior Manager, Accessibility and Regulatory, T-Mobile
  • Debra Ruh, CEO, Ruh Global Communications
  • Frances W. West, IT Executive
  • Rachel S. Wolkowitz, J.D., Wilkinson Barker Knauer LLP

For more information about WID’s Board, go to the Meet Our Board page.

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Chapter 8: Retirement

This chapter offers bulletproof retirement strategies that people with disabilities can employ right now to improve economic self-sufficiency. Learn about everything from long-term investment and taking advantage of compound interest, to different ways to save money and still keep government benefits. More information can be found in Chapter 8 of the EQUITY book.

Chapter 8 Retirement (PDF)

Video

Tools

For a lot of people, retirement seems very far off, but if you plan for it now, your future self will thank you!

Retirement Planning

Use this retirement planning tool to help you see how much savings you will have after investing a certain amount per month. Just enter how much you will put into savings each month into “monthly contribution” and enter the interest rate on your investments into “interest rate.” Then, choose “number of years” to see your final savings!

Retirement Planning tool (Excel)

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